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Archive for the ‘Family: Bellflower’ Category

Another bellflower!  This one, Campanula rotundifolia, is called a Harebell in English and Liten Blåklocka in Swedish (which means ‘little blue bell’).  The harebell’s flowers are more delicate than the nettle-leaved bellflower I posted about earlier. The harebell is shorter (12-20 mm) and hairless with very thin stalks.

 

Harebell (Liten Blåklocka) Stockholm, Sweden

Below, you can see the curly things around the style.  Are these the stamens (the male organs of the flower)?

Harebell (Liten Blåklocka), Stockholm, Sweden

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It is July in Sweden and this blue flower seems to be on every corner!  Its name in English, Nettle-leaved Bellflower, is self-explanatory when you see the flowers hanging like bells from the stems.  In Swedish, Nässelklocka means ‘Nettle Bell’.  I took these pictures near the beach south of Helsingborg on the west coast of Sweden.  I’ve also seen it growing on the side of the streets and in the corners of parks in Stockholm.

Bellflower, Helsingborg, Sweden

Bellflower, Helsingborg, Sweden

I am still not quite sure if I’ve gotten this one right, though, many of the bellflowers seem  pretty similar and this actually might be the Giant Bellflower or Hässleklocka (Hazel Bell, because it grows near Hazel trees).  The Nettle bellflower seems more correct, though, because it grows in woods, scrub and hedges whereas the giant bellflower grows mainly in hills and mountains.  It could be either, though, because this pretty flower may have escaped from people’s gardens and could maybe live anywhere!

Bellflower, Helsingborg, Sweden

I love how when you get close to this flower, you notice its delicate stigma, like the clapper in a bell.  The stigma is the top of the style which is the tube extending from the flower’s ovary.  The job of the stigma is to receive the pollen during fertilization.

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